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The Motivational Impact of Nicotine and Its Role in Tobacco Use: Final Comments and Priorities

  • Michael T. Bardo
  • Paul Schnur
Chapter
Part of the Nebraska Symposium on Motivation book series (NSM, volume 55)

Minimizing the incidence of tobacco use requires a broad spectrum approach across the lifespan. For adolescents who are at risk for initiation, changes in public policy in the United States have reduced access to cigarettes, and school-based prevention programs have been implemented with some success (Nabors, Iobst, & McGrady, 2007). Mass media campaigns targeting youth at risk have also shown some efficacy (Emery et al., 2005), although this may not generalize to televised campaigns that are sponsored specifically by tobacco companies (Wakefield et al., 2006). When prevention efforts fail and tobacco use ensues, intervention strategies tend to shift from universal campaigns that reach the general population to more intense behavioral and pharmacological interventions that target selected groups or individuals. Although there has been an increasing emphasis on tobacco cessation programs that target youths in school (Curry et al., 2007), the quit rate among youths is low. As a result,...

Keywords

Nicotine Addiction Stimulant Class Nicotine Vaccine Midbrain Dopamine System Fund Opportunity Announcement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors would like to thank Dr. Allison Chausmer for her contribution to the writing of this chapter. MTB supported by USPHS grant U19 DA17548.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA

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