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Demographic and Morphological Perspectives on Life History Evolution and Conservation of New World Monkeys

  • Gregory E. Blomquist
  • Martin M. Kowalewski
  • Steven R. Leigh
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Keywords

Life History Life History Trait Population Growth Rate Squirrel Monkey World Monkey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory E. Blomquist
    • 1
  • Martin M. Kowalewski
  • Steven R. Leigh
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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