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Comparative Perspectives in the Study of South American Primates: Research Priorities and Conservation Imperatives

  • Alejandro Estrada
  • Paul A. Garber
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Keywords

World Monkey Dominant Male Comparative Perspective Howler Monkey Primate Population 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alejandro Estrada
    • 1
  • Paul A. Garber
  1. 1.Estación de Biología Tropical Los TuxtlasInstituto de Biología Universidad Nacional Autónoma de MéxicoMéxico

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