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Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation

  • John E. Wagner
  • Claudio Brunstein
  • William Tse
  • Mary Laughlin
Chapter
Part of the Cancer Treatment and Research book series (CTAR, volume 144)

Introduction

Use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) as a clinical source of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) was first considered in the late 1960s. In the first known published report of its use, Ende et al. [1] infused freshly procured UCB samples from eight donors to a 16-year-old male with acute lymphocytic leukemia. While long-term hematopoietic reconstitution was not demonstrated, Ende et al. documented transient alteration in red cell antigens in the peripheral blood, suggesting a transient mixed chimerism from at least one UCB unit. Studies subsequently performed by Koike et al. [2] and Vidal et al. [3] in the late 1970s and early 1980s, however, provided for the first real evidence that UCB may contain sufficient numbers of hematopoietic progenitor cells for transplantation. However, it was not until experiments performed by Broxmeyer et al. [4] that ultimately led to the first UCB transplantation, which took place on October 6, 1988 at the Hôpital St. Louis in Paris for a child...

Keywords

Umbilical Cord Blood Acute GvHD Chronic GvHD Cell Dose Umbilical Cord Blood Transplantation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • John E. Wagner
    • 1
  • Claudio Brunstein
  • William Tse
  • Mary Laughlin
  1. 1.University of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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