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Fundamental principles and processes

  • Gadhiraju Venkatarathnam
Chapter
Part of the International Cryogenics Monograph Series book series (ICMS)

Abstract

Single-stage mixed refrigerant processes that can provide refrigeration at very low temperatures were first proposed nearly 70 years ago by Podbielniak [69] and were adopted for large-scale liquefaction of natural gas after the pioneering work of Kleemenko [50] of the former Soviet Union in the 1960s. Today most base-load natural gas liquefaction plants operate on mixed refrigerant processes. Mixed refrigerant processes have also been adopted for peak-shaving natural gas liquefaction plants.

Keywords

Heat Exchanger Exergy Efficiency Exergy Loss Pinch Point Cold Stream 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIndian Institute of Technology MadrasChennaiIndia

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