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The Southern Ontario All-sky Meteor Camera Network

  • R. J. WerykEmail author
  • P. G. Brown
  • A. Domokos
  • W. N. Edwards
  • Z. Krzeminski
  • S. H. Nudds
  • D. L. Welch
Chapter 2: Observation Techniques and Programs

Abstract

We have developed an automated network of all-sky CCD video systems to detect medium–large meteoroids ablating over Southern Ontario, Canada. The system currently consists of five stations with the largest baseline being 180 km. Each site runs a video rate recorder with sufficient resolution to determine meteoroid trajectories with a typical precision of about 300 m but no worse than 1 km. The sensitivity of the camera is close to a stellar visual magnitude of +1 which allows for astrometric calibrations using field stars. Photometric procedures have also been developed and tested. The system has a limiting magnitude for meteors of about −2 with the current detection algorithm.

Keywords

Meteors All-sky Detection Real-time 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. Weryk
    • 1
    Email author
  • P. G. Brown
    • 1
  • A. Domokos
    • 1
  • W. N. Edwards
    • 2
  • Z. Krzeminski
    • 1
  • S. H. Nudds
    • 1
  • D. L. Welch
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Physics and AstronomyUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada
  2. 2.Department of Earth ScienceUniversity of Western OntarioLondonCanada
  3. 3.Department of Physics and AstronomyMcMaster UniversityHamiltonCanada

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