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Epidemiology and Surveillance of HIV Infection and AIDS Among Non-Hispanic Blacks in the United States

  • Anna Satcher Johnson
  • Xiangming Wei
  • Xiaohong Hu
  • Hazel D. Dean
Chapter

Abstarct

In June 1981, the first five cases of AIDS were recognized in the United States, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) began tracking reported cases (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1981). By June 1982, more than 400 AIDS cases had been reported to CDC, with 19% of these cases occurring among non-Hispanic blacks (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1982). By 1996 and continuing through today, more cases have been diagnosed among blacks each year than among any other racial or ethnic population (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 1996). In 2006, blacks accounted for 13% of the population of the United States, yet they accounted for 49% (17,960) of new AIDS diagnoses that year (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2008a; U.S. Census Bureau, 2006).

Keywords

Black Woman Racial Disparity Black Child Local Health Department Black Adult 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna Satcher Johnson
    • 1
  • Xiangming Wei
  • Xiaohong Hu
  • Hazel D. Dean
  1. 1.Division of HIV/AIDS Prevention, National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention, Office of Infectious DiseasesCenters for Disease Control and PreventionAtlantaUSA

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