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Stress and Mental Health

  • Robert M. Bray
  • Laurel L. Hourani
  • Jason Williams
  • Marian E. Lane
  • Mary Ellen Marsden
Chapter

Abstract

Concern over large numbers of psychological casualties among military personnel returning from Afghanistan and Iraq during Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom has led to renewed impetus to identify those at risk for serious mental health problems. The Department of Defense Surveys of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel (HRB surveys) provide the first population-based mental health data on active duty military personnel in all service branches worldwide. Since 1988, the HRB survey series has contained a set of questions related to the stress and mental health of active duty personnel. This chapter presents findings related to the issues of mental health, exposure to challenges eliciting stress, coping strategies, and help-seeking. Trends, prevalence rates, and a wide range of risk and protective factors are examined for multiple screening measures, including work and family stress, depression, generalized anxiety disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), suicidal ideation, and receipt of mental health counseling.

Keywords

Mental Health Problem Suicidal Ideation Generalize Anxiety Disorder Ptsd Symptom Military Personnel 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Bray
    • 1
  • Laurel L. Hourani
    • 1
  • Jason Williams
    • 1
  • Marian E. Lane
    • 1
  • Mary Ellen Marsden
    • 1
  1. 1.RTI InternationalResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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