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Health Behaviors and Health Status

  • Robert M. Bray
  • Laurel L. Hourani
  • Jason Williams
  • Marian E. Lane
  • Mary Ellen Marsden
Chapter

Abstract

Healthy and fit service members are critical to a ready and effective military force. Many factors affect the health of military personnel such as exposure to disease and risk of illness and injury in the performance of their duties. In addition, lifestyle choices related to diet and nutrition, exercise, and substance use can have a positive or negative impact on health. This chapter examines healthy lifestyles and health promotion among active duty military personnel with an emphasis on exercise, overweight and obesity status, nutrition, illness, and injury. It reports progress of the active duty military population in meeting selected Healthy People 2010 objectives; examines trends in overweight, illness, and injury; and assesses the correlates and predictors of healthy behaviors. Data are drawn from the 1995 to 2008 Department of Defense (DoD) Surveys of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel (HRB surveys).

Keywords

Illicit Drug Healthy People Binge Drinking Military Personnel Smokeless Tobacco 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Bray
    • 1
  • Laurel L. Hourani
    • 1
  • Jason Williams
    • 1
  • Marian E. Lane
    • 1
  • Mary Ellen Marsden
    • 1
  1. 1.RTI InternationalResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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