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Substance Abuse

  • Robert M. Bray
  • Laurel L. Hourani
  • Jason Williams
  • Marian E. Lane
  • Mary Ellen Marsden
Chapter

Abstract

Substance use and abuse in the military has been a long-standing concern because of its negative impact on military readiness and productivity and because it is among the most preventable causes of health- and work-related problems. Preventing substance abuse is a cornerstone of Healthy People 2020 objectives and military health promotion policy. Using comprehensive data on substance use in the active duty population from the 1980 to 2008 Department of Defense (DoD) Surveys of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel (HRB surveys), this chapter examines trends and correlates in substance use and consequences of substance use among military personnel. Substance use includes illicit drugs, binge and heavy alcohol use, and cigarette smoking; serious negative consequences examine alcohol-related negative effects, alcohol dependence, and nicotine dependence. This chapter also compares substance use rates among military personnel and civilians, and examines the correlates and predictors of substance use and related consequences among military personnel.

Keywords

Illicit Drug Alcohol Dependence Binge Drinking Nicotine Dependence Heavy Drinking 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Bray
    • 1
  • Laurel L. Hourani
    • 1
  • Jason Williams
    • 1
  • Marian E. Lane
    • 1
  • Mary Ellen Marsden
    • 1
  1. 1.RTI InternationalResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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