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Methodology

  • Robert M. Bray
  • Laurel L. Hourani
  • Jason Williams
  • Marian E. Lane
  • Mary Ellen Marsden
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter presents the methods that were used in conducting the Department of Defense Surveys of Health Related Behaviors Among Active Duty Military Personnel from 1980 to 2008. This information provides the backdrop for understanding the findings presented throughout the book. This chapter provides a brief history of the surveys, including their objectives, along with the types of items asked in the questionnaires and how these have changed across the years. This chapter also describes the sampling and data collection methods that have been used and the resulting survey response rates. A key focus is on the definitions of the measures and study constructs that are examined in this book.

Keywords

Military Personnel Active Duty Marine Corps Combat Exposure Prescription Drug Misuse 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert M. Bray
    • 1
  • Laurel L. Hourani
    • 1
  • Jason Williams
    • 1
  • Marian E. Lane
    • 1
  • Mary Ellen Marsden
    • 1
  1. 1.RTI InternationalResearch Triangle ParkUSA

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