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Health Science Policy

  • Frederick Mosteller
Chapter

Abstract

When David Hamburg came to Harvard to lead the Division of Health Policy Research and Education, he wanted to establish Working Groups somewhat comparable to the committees used by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) to guide its program. He and I had become acquainted when he was president of the IOM and I served on several of its committees. After several meetings, we developed the idea of a Health Science Policy Working Group that I would chair. To do this meant giving up the Surgery Group, which was still active in spite of the death of John Raker, who, with Benjamin Barnes, had advised us on surgery. The new Division was an umbrella organization, university wide, but especially connected to the Medical School, the School of Public Health, and the Kennedy School of Government. Within the School of Public Health, the Center for the Analysis of Health Practices, directed by Howard Frazier, and the Department of Health Policy and Management, which I chaired, were units with special interests in the Division.

Keywords

Science Writer Interdisciplinary Work Umbrella Organization Garbage Dump Kennedy School 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederick Mosteller
    • 1
  1. 1.BelmontUSA

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