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Spinal Cord Injuries

  • Fred H. Geisler
  • William P. Coleman

Abstract

Approximately, 200,000 people in the United States have spinal cord injuries (SCI), and some 10,000 new injuries occur annually. Most new victims are between 18 and 30 years old. The lifetime costs of paraplegia for such patients can exceed several million dollars in medical support and lost wages. The potential mechanisms of injury include compression, distraction, acceleration–deceleration, and shearing forces, as well as direct section from penetrating injuries.

Keywords

Spinal Cord Spinal Cord Injury Functional Electrical Stimulation Surgical Decompression Acute Spinal Cord Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fred H. Geisler
    • 1
  • William P. Coleman
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryIllinois Neuro-Spine Center, Rush Copley Medical CenterAuroraUSA
  2. 2.WPCMathBuffaloUSA

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