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Spin Waves pp 169-202 | Cite as

Propagation Characteristics and Excitation of Dipolar Spin Waves

  • Daniel D Stancil
  • Anil Prabhakar
Chapter

Chapter 5 treated the resonant frequencies, dispersion relations, and mode fields for various dipolar spin modes. In this chapter, we expand on the properties of dipolar spin waves in thin films and describe how to excite them. We first establish approximate expressions for the Poynting vector and energy velocity valid in the magnetostatic approximation. Next, we apply the phenomenological description of magnetic damping introduced in Chapter 3 to the problem of dipolar spin wave attenuation. Finally, we derive orthogonality and normalization conditions and use these relations to calculate the excitation of dipolar spin waves by thin wires and conducting strips.

Keywords

Surface Wave Spin Wave Insertion Loss Radiation Resistance Return Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag US 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Carnegie Mellon UniversityPittsburghUSA
  2. 2.Indian Institute of TechnologyChennaiIndia

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