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How?

Developing the Plan and Making It Happen
  • Erin L. Dolan
Part of the Mentoring in Academia and Industry book series (MAI, volume 1)
In general, the process of developing and implementing K-12 O&E activities involves:
  • Identifying, as appropriate, the needs of teachers, students, and scientists by listening and observing

  • Identifying resources, including materials, technical, and personnel support, that can meet those needs

  • Planning and implementing activities that match needs with resources

  • Evaluating to determine whether needs are met and to inform future efforts

  • Documenting and disseminating the outcomes of the work

This chapter offers advice about initiating, planning, and implementing K-12 OO&E activities. Criteria that will help maximize the likelihood of achieving K-12 OO&E goals are noted throughout. Also described are a series of concrete examples of projects at different stages of development. Some are just starting while others are well established. Project descriptions are written by the individuals involved, providing glimpses into the different motivations, rationales, and approaches to their work and illustrating the myriad ways they have gone about K-12 OO&E.

Keywords

High School Student High School Teacher Virginia Tech Howard Hughes Medical Institute Mentor Teacher 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Erin L. Dolan
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Biochemistry Fralin Center Virginia TechBlacksburgUSA

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