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Microcombustors for Rotating Machinery

  • C.M. Spadaccini
  • I.A. Waitz
Chapter
Part of the MEMS Reference Shelf book series (MEMSRS)

Abstract

To drive microscale rotating machinery such as a microengine, motor-compressor, or generator, energy must be added to the system. This can take many forms depending on the application, however, for an engine intended to be a primary power source; this is usually thermal energy. Adding heat to an engine is most commonly achieved via a combustion system where a fuel is mixed with an oxidizer and burned. Due to the high-energy density of liquid hydrocarbons, they are the most common fuels and are mixed and burned with air. For a microengine, this system is termed the microcombustor.

Keywords

Mass Flow Rate Combustion Chamber Equivalence Ratio Recirculation Zone Peclet Number 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • C.M. Spadaccini
    • 1
  • I.A. Waitz
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Micro and Nano Technology, Engineering Technologies DivisionLivermoreUSA
  2. 2.Department of Aeronautics and AstronauticsMassachusetts Institute of TechnologyCambridgeUSA

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