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Individual and Contextual Factors That Influence AA Affiliation and Outcomes

  • Michael P. Bogenschutz
Chapter
Part of the Recent Developments in Alcoholism book series (RDIA, volume 18)

Introduction

Scope of the Chapter

This chapter addresses the role of various factors moderating (1) affiliation with AA and (2) the effects of AA on substance use and other outcomes. These may include personal characteristics as well as environmental and situational factors. Meta-analyses indicate that there is substantial variation in twelve-step involvement and outcomes among studies, depending at least in part on characteristics of the sample (Tonigan, Toscova, & Miller, 1996). To some extent, the relevant personal characteristics may overlap with those discussed in the preceding chapter on special populations. It is important to note that the factors that affect AA affiliation, and the effects of these factors, are not necessarily the same as those that influence the effect of AA affiliation on distal outcomes.

Methodological Issues

Rigor is required in the definitions of key constructs such as “AA involvement” and “AA affiliation” (Cloud, Ziegler, & Blondell, 2004). A number of...

Keywords

Alcohol Dependence Therapeutic Community Project Match Criminal Justice System Involvement Wait List Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Health Sciences CenterUniversity of New Mexico, Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and AddictionsAlbuquerqueUSA

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