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Spiritual Change in Recovery

  • Gerard J. Connors
  • Kimberly S. Walitzer
  • J. Scott Tonigan
Chapter
Part of the Recent Developments in Alcoholism book series (RDIA, volume 18)

Introduction

Alcoholism has often been referred to as a “spiritual disease,” especially within the context of Alcoholics Anonymous (AA). Consistent with this view, spiritual growth and development have been a central focus within the recovery process. AA, in this respect, offers a spiritual path to recovery from alcohol use disorders.

In this chapter, we focus broadly on spiritual change in recovery, particularly in relation to involvement in AA. We open with a discussion on defining spirituality and provide an operationalization of spirituality for present purposes. We next provide a conceptualization of alcoholism as a spiritual disease. This is followed by a review of topics pertaining to spirituality and AA. In this regard, we identify the core spiritual beliefs in AA, the AA practices thought to be relevant to spirituality, and the subjective experiences of spirituality in AA. We also discuss the important issue of spiritual awakenings. Following this, we survey the literature on...

Keywords

Spiritual Belief Spiritual Experience Spiritual Practice Alcoholic Anonymous Spiritual Coping 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerard J. Connors
    • 1
  • Kimberly S. Walitzer
    • 2
  • J. Scott Tonigan
    • 3
  1. 1.Research Institute on AddictionsUniversity at BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  2. 2.Research Institute on AddictionsUniversity at BuffaloBuffaloUSA
  3. 3.Center on Alcoholism, Substance Abuse, and AddictionsUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

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