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Historical Review: 1750–2000

  • André Nijsen
Chapter
Part of the International Studies in Entrepreneurship book series (ISEN, volume 20)

Abstract

Today, compliance costs of businesses are part of the political agendas of many countries from the EU, the OECD and even developing and transition countries. This has not always been the case. It was good old Adam Smith who said in 1778 “Every tax ought to be so contrived as both to take out and to keep out of the pockets of the people as little as possible over and above what it brings to the public treasury of the state.”

From that time on, it took more than 200 years before a systematic monitoring of the development of only a part of the compliance costs, e.g. the compliance costs of information obligations started at the end of the 20th century. This chapter highlights the major phases between the first recognition by professionals until the establishment of monitoring systems. The more recent developments from 2000 onwards will not be illustrated in this but in the following chapters.

Keywords

OECD Country Economic Affair Compliance Cost Regulatory Reform Administrative Burden 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Adviser Regulatory ReformSchoonhoven

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