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Domesticity and Daily Life

  • Angela Middleton
Chapter
Part of the Contributions To Global Historical Archaeology book series (CGHA)

Introduction

The data of archaeology consist of the discarded materials of everyday life. The wider events of colonialism and globalization are reflected in these materials as goods produced in Britain, such as glass and ceramics, were scattered throughout widely separated parts of the globe, from Europe to South Africa, Australia, and New Zealand (Brooks 1999, 2003; Klose and Malan 2000; Lawrence 2003; Malan and Klose 2003). This chapter demonstrates the nature of the CMS mission in New Zealand, the small scale of its operations, its dependence on the local, indigenous economy, and the model of the family and domesticity that lay at its core. Included in the baggage of missionary arrivals in New Zealand were attitudes relating to class as well as gender, carried with them from Georgian Britain. Within the small community, evidence can be found of efforts to replicate and maintain the class structure of their homeland (Middleton 2007a). This included an ideology of respectability, in...

Keywords

Nineteenth Century Mission Station Archaeological Assemblage Private Account Clay Pipe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Angela Middleton
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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