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Pharmacologic Hemodynamic Therapy of Shock

  • Christina Rose
  • Neil W. Brister
  • David E. Ciccolella
Chapter

Abstract

Know the indications and contraindications for each medication. Know the clinical hemodynamic effects of each medication. Know the potential complications associated with each medication. Know the use of these agents in specific shock states.

Keywords

Cardiac Output Spinal Cord Injury Septic Shock Right Ventricular Central Venous Pressure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Additional Reading

  1. Russell JA, Walley KR, Singer J, et al. Vasopressin versus norepinephrine infusion in patients with septic shock. N Engl J Med. 2008;358(9):877-887.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Annane D, Vignon P, Renault A, et al. Norepinephrine plus dobutamine versus epinephrine alone for management of septic shock: a randomised trial. Lancet. 2007;370(9588):676-684.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) Clinical Trials Network, Wheeler AP, Bernard GR, et al. Pulmonary-artery versus central venous catheter to guide treatment of acute lung injury. N Engl J Med. 2006;354(21):2213-2224.Google Scholar
  4. Durairaj L, Schmidt GA. Fluid therapy in resuscitated sepsis: less is more. Chest. 2008;133(1):252-263.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Pinsky MR, Payen D. Functional hemodynamic monitoring. Crit Care. 2005;9(6):566-572.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christina Rose
    • 1
  • Neil W. Brister
    • 2
  • David E. Ciccolella
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Pharmacy PracticeTemple University School of PharmacyPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnesthesiologyTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care MedicineTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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