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Ethics in Critical Care

  • John M. Travaline
  • Friedrich Kueppers
  • Jacqueline S. Urtecho
Chapter

Abstract

Know the four fundamental principles of medical ethics. Understand the importance of obtaining informed consent. Know when an order for no resuscitation is appropriate. Understand the issues regarding withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining therapy, organ donation, and the concept of medical futility. Understand the role of ethics consultation in the critical care setting.

Keywords

Critical Care Brain Death Advance Directive Ethic Consultation Critical Care Setting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Additional Reading

  1. American College of Physicians Ethics Manual. Ann Intern Med. 2005;142:560-582.Google Scholar
  2. American Thoracic Society. Withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining therapy. Am Rev Respir Dis. 1991;144:726-731.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs, American Medical Association. Guidelines for the appropriate use of do-not-resuscitate orders. JAMA. 1991;265:1868-1871.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Thompson DR, Kummer HB, eds. Critical Care Ethics. Society of Critical Care Medicine. 2nd ed. Society of Critical Care Medicine, 2009. Google Scholar
  5. Orlowski JP. Ethics in Critical Care Medicine. Hagerstown, MD: University Publishing Group; 1999.Google Scholar
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  8. The Ethics Committee of the Society of Critical Care Medicine. Consensus statement of the Society of Critical Care Medicine’s Ethics Committee regarding futile and other possibly inadvisable treatments. Crit Care Med. 1997;25:887-891.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. The President’s Commission for the Study of Ethical Problems in Medicine and Biomedical Research. No. 040-000-00459-9. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office; 1982.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Travaline
    • 1
  • Friedrich Kueppers
    • 1
  • Jacqueline S. Urtecho
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care MedicineTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of NeurologyTemple University Medical CenterPhiladelphiaUSA

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