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Evaluation and Management of Toxicological Emergencies

  • Frederic H. Kauffman
  • Kathryn Getzewich
Chapter

Abstract

After studying this chapter, you should be able to: List the methods available for decreasing toxin absorption in the gastrointestinal tract, with the indications, contraindications, and potential complications of each method. Describe toxin exposures for which enhancing toxin elimination is possible, with the specific means to do so. Describe the limitations of toxicologic drug screening, with indications for its use in specific clinical scenarios. Know those toxin exposures for which specific antidotes exist, with the indications and potential complications of their use. Identify the principles by which an exposure can be determined to be nontoxic and have a working knowledge of the many household items that are nontoxic. Describe mechanisms by which unknown compounds can be identified.

Keywords

Gastric Emptying Activate Charcoal Altered Mental Status Dose Information Lavage Tube 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Additional Reading

  1. Goldfrank LR, Flomenbaum NE, Lewin NA, et al., eds. Goldfrank’s Toxicologic Emergencies. 7th ed. New York: McGraw Hill; 2002.Google Scholar
  2. Toxicology (Part IV, Section II): Toxicology: In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen’s Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia: Mosby, Elsevier; 2006.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frederic H. Kauffman
    • 1
  • Kathryn Getzewich
    • 2
  1. 1.Departments of Emergency Medicine and MedicineTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Department of Emergency MedicineTemple University School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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