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Nursing Care in the Intensive Care Unit Setting: The Role of the Nurse in the ICU

  • Gwendolyn Vance
  • Debra Koczen-Doyle
  • Deborah Mcgee-Mccullough
  • Anne Marie Kuzma
  • Marianne Butler-Lebair
Chapter

Abstract

After studying this chapter, you should be able to: Identify the role the critical care nurse (CCN) plays as an advocate for the critically ill patients and their family. Recognize the contribution of the CCN to the critical care team through collaboration and communication. Describe the role of the CCN in patient assessment and subsequent formulation of the plan-of-care. Categorize the critical nursing interventions that can prevent or mitigate nosocomial infections and common complications seen in the critically ill patient.

Keywords

Intensive Care Unit Critical Care Healthcare Team Intensive Care Unit Setting Clinical Nurse Specialist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Additional Reading

  1. American Nurses Association. Code of Ethics for Nurses with Imperative Statements. Washington, DC: ANA; 2001.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gwendolyn Vance
    • 1
  • Debra Koczen-Doyle
    • 2
  • Deborah Mcgee-Mccullough
    • 3
  • Anne Marie Kuzma
    • 4
  • Marianne Butler-Lebair
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical CareTemple University HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Temple Lung CenterTemple University HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Temple Lung Center, Division of Pulmonary and Critical care MedicineTemple University HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Department of Nursing, Temple Lung CenterTemple University HospitalPhiladelphiaUSA

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