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Yogurt

  • Don Tribby
Chapter

A Brief History of Yogurt

Yogurt has been consumed since recorded time. It is not exactly known how yogurt was discovered, but it is assumed that it was by accident, perhaps by Mesopotamians in about 5000 bc (Kosikowski and Mistry, 1997). During this time, herdsman would milk goats and sheep and carry the milk with them in pouches made from an animal’s stomach. These stomachs contained a natural enzyme, called chymosin, which forms a gel or coagulum when added to milk. Given (1) the warm climate in this part of the world, (2) the storage conditions available at the time, and (3) “natural starter culture” in the milk – either yogurt or cheese was made. Fermentation probably began within a few hours. Most likely, these people noted that this soured milk product tended to keep longer and they grew to prefer the flavor of yogurt to that of fresh milk. These people also eventually realized the health benefits of eating yogurt, and much later, some observers wrote about living a longer and...

Keywords

Starter Culture Potassium Sorbate Invert Sugar Lactobacillus Bulgaricus Weak Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Don Tribby
    • 1
  1. 1.DaniscoKS

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