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Ceremonial Site Locations, Descriptions, and Bibliography

  • D. Troy Case
  • Christopher Carr
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

This chapter familiarizes the reader with each of the 52 Ohio Hopewellian mound and earthen enclosure ceremonial sites coded in the HOPEBIOARCH data base. The geographic locations of the sites, overviews of their contents, maps of their layouts, general assessments of the quality of available information on the sites, and bibliographic and curatorial information are presented. The chapter is complemented by the next,  Chapter 8, which defines the variables that are used in the HOPEBIOARCH data base to describe the burials and ceremonial deposits within the 52 sites. Together, the two chapters familiarize the reader with the data base—its observations and variables, rows and columns.

Keywords

Unpublished Document Historical Society Horizontal Location Peabody Museum Middle Woodland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. Troy Case
    • 1
  • Christopher Carr
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighNorth Carolina
  2. 2.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State UniversityTempeArizona

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