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World View and the Dynamics of Change: The Beginning and the End of Scioto Hopewell Culture and Lifeways

  • Christopher Carr
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The origin and end of Scioto Hopewell culture and lifeways have puzzled archaeologists for decades. This uncertainty exists in part because, until very recently, the details of organization and operation of Scioto Hopewellian social and ceremonial life and the outlines of Scioto Hopewellian spiritual thought have not been known. How Scioto Hopewellian social and ceremonial life emerged and disappeared could not be adequately addressed when it was unclear what they were specifically and what factors might thus have caused them. Uncertainly also exists because, in this lacuna in knowledge about the inner workings of Hopewellian life, archaeologists have been forced to look for possible causes of it that were external rather than internal to it; and no reasonably convincing external causes have been found.

Keywords

World View Burial Mound Horizontal Relationship Middle Woodland Ceremonial Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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