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Settlement and Communities

  • Christopher Carr
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The daily lives of Hopewell people in the Scioto-Paint Creek area were spent largely individually or in small groups close to nature. Away from the great earthworks and burial mounds, in the deep forests on the terraces and bottomlands of the Scioto and Paint Creek valleys, small groups of one or two extended families built their homes and made their gardens in dispersed locations. Smaller portions of such a residential group hunted, gathered, grew crops, collected shellfish, and fished together in the main valleys and, at particular times of the year, made trips to the valley edges and up secondary streams to gather and hunt wild foods. Sometimes, a part or all of a residential group might move to these more remote settings for a harvesting period.

Keywords

Residential Site Sustainable Community Residential Stability Residential Community Deceased Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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