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Environmental Setting, Natural Symbols, and Subsistence

  • Christopher Carr
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The social and ceremonial lives of Scioto Hopewell peoples were richly interconnected with the natural, experiential, and culturally interpreted, symbolic qualities of the land in which they made their home. The Scioto-Paint Creek area was both a medium for the creative expression of Hopewellian beliefs and practices, and a setting that presented a limited range of experiences and various ecological restrictions, which encouraged Hopewellian thought, activities, and society to develop in certain broad directions. Places of extraordinary character in the Scioto and Paint Creek valleys were selected by Hopewell people as the locations of their ceremonial centers. Animal species of the area served as templates for leadership roles, clan identities, and clan organization, and as means for obtaining personal power and journeying to an afterlife. Natural qualities of the valleys also helped to mold the densities and spatial distributions Hopewellian people there, affecting the sizes and complexity of their societies and rituals.

Keywords

Wild Food Garden Plot Middle Woodland Honey Locust Ceremonial Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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