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Coming to Know Ohio Hopewell Peoples Better: Topics for Future Research, Masters’ Theses, and Doctoral Dissertations

  • Christopher Carr
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

How does one come to know another? For archaeologists who are students of a past society, its people, and their culture, this is an essential question. Necessarily, understanding people in another culture and arriving at views that are faithful to theirs come from immersing oneself in the details of their lives, and the social, cultural, natural, and historical contexts in which their lives were lived out. Only by situating oneself in their world and developing an awareness of their ideas, actions, responses, and sensitivities in varying contexts can one hope to begin to experience their lives as they did – to gain insight into their motivations and preferences and limitations, and the choices in thought and deed that they made. For an archaeologist, this situating process can be done only by reconstructing the particulars of past people’s lives, which means fine-grained, contextualizing, and expansive exploration of archaeological data.

Keywords

Human Remains Sustainable Community North Fork Burial Mound Middle Woodland 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

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