Advertisement

Data Accuracy and Precision: A Comparison of the HOPEBIOARCH Data Base to N. Greber’s and T. Lloyd’s Data Bases

  • Christopher Carr
  • Beau J. Goldstein
  • D. Troy Case
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Accurate reconstruction of the social and cultural lives of Ohio Hopewell peoples requires sound bioarchaeological data. Assessing the quality of the information presented in the HOPEBIOARCH data base is thus a necessary precursor to using it successfully to search for and analyze socially and culturally significant material patterns.

Keywords

Data Base Field Note Human Remains Laboratory Observation Artifact Type 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Carr, Christopher 2005a The Tripartite Ceremonial Alliance among Scioto Hopewellian Communities and the Question of Social Ranking. In Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction, edited by C. Carr and D. T. Case, pp. 258–338. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  2. Carr, Christopher, and D. Troy Case 2005a The Gathering of Hopewell. In Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction, edited by C. Carr and D. T. Case, pp. 19–50. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  3. Carr, Christopher, Beau J. Goldstein, and Jaimin Weets 2005 Estimating the Sizes and Social Compositions of Mortuary-Related Gatherings at Scioto Hopewell Earthwork-Mound Sites. In Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction, edited by C. Carr and D. T. Case, pp. 480–532. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  4. Greber, N’omi 1976 Within Ohio Hopewell: Analysis of Burial Patterns from Several Classic Sites. Ph.D. dissertation, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH.Google Scholar
  5. Greber, N’omi, and Katharine Ruhl 1989 The Hopewell Site: A Contemporary Analysis Based on the Works of Charles C. Willoughby. Westview Press, Boulder, CO.Google Scholar
  6. Johnston, Cheryl A. 1997b Age and Sex Data for Skeletons from the Hopewell Site. Document on file at the Ohio Historical Center, Columbus, OH.Google Scholar
  7. Johnston, Cheryl A. 2002 Culturally Modified Human Remains from the Hopewell Mound Group. Doctoral dissertation, The Ohio State University. Columbus, OH.Google Scholar
  8. Moorehead, Warren King 1891–1892 Record of Warren K. Moorehead, Explorations, Little Miami Valley, Ohio, April 1891–Jan. 1892. Field notes on file, File A-17, Folder 6, Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago.Google Scholar
  9. Moorehead, Warren King 1922 The Hopewell Mound Group of Ohio. Field Museum of Natural History, Publication 211; Anthropological Series 6(5):73–184, plates 51–83. Chicago, ILGoogle Scholar
  10. Pickering, Robert B. 1987 Table 1: Inventory of Hopewell Skeletons Identified by Moorehead’s Numbering System. Manuscript on file at the Field Museum of Natural History, Chicago, IL.Google Scholar
  11. Reichs, Katherine J. 1975 Biological Variability and the Hopewell Phenomenon: An Interregional Approach. Doctoral dissertation, Department of Anthropology, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL.Google Scholar
  12. Ruby, Bret J., Christopher Carr, and Douglas K. Charles 2005 Community Organizations in the Scioto, mann, and havana Hopewellian Regions: A Comparative Perspective. In Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction, edited by C. Carr and D. T. Case, pp. 119–176. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York.Google Scholar
  13. Shetrone, Henry Clyde 1922 Field Notes: The Hopewell Group (Accession #283). Document on file at the Ohio Historical Center, Columbus, Ohio.Google Scholar
  14. Shetrone, Henry Clyde 1924 Field Notes: The Hopewell Group (Accession #283). Document on file at the Ohio Historical Center, Columbus, Ohio.Google Scholar
  15. Shetrone, Henry Clyde 1925 Field Notes: The Hopewell Group (Accession #283). Document on file at the Ohio Historical Center, Columbus, Ohio.Google Scholar
  16. Shetrone, Henry Clyde 1926a Explorations of the Hopewell Group of Prehistoric Earthworks. Ohio State Archaeological and Historical Quarterly 35:1–227.Google Scholar
  17. Snow, Charles 1943 Craniometric Data Sheets for Ohio Hopewell Skeletons. Document on file at the Ohio Historical Center, Columbus, Ohio, and with Lyle Konigsberg, Department of Anthropology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville.Google Scholar
  18. Carr, Christopher 2005c Scioto Hopewell Ritual Gatherings: A Review and Discussion of Previous Interpretations and Data. In Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction, edited by C. Carr and D. T. Case, pp. 463–479. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  • Beau J. Goldstein
    • 2
  • D. Troy Case
    • 3
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Transcon EnvironmentalMesa
  3. 3.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

Personalised recommendations