Advertisement

Contextualizing Preanalyses of the Ohio Hopewell Mortuary Data, II: Associations of Artifact Classes across Burials

  • Christopher Carr
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

The social and ritual lives of a past people can sometimes be known through the paraphernalia and symbols that individuals used in the course of their social relations and in performing their social roles. Ohio Hopewell diviners, for example, used mica mirrors, reflective galena cubes, transparent quartz and gem bifaces, and obsidian bifaces, individually and together in various combinations. Both the ceremonial functions of the individual artifact classes and the ceremonial use of multiple artifact classes as a set to accomplish particular ritual goals reveal the workings of diviners in Ohio Hopewell societies.

Keywords

Multidimensional Scaling Social Role Redundant Variable Artifact Type Jaccard Similarity Coefficient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

References

  1. Carr, Christopher, Beau J. Goldstein, and Jaimin Weets 2005 Estimating the Sizes and Social Compositions of Mortuary-Related Gatherings at Scioto Hopewell Earthwork-Mound Sites. In Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction, edited by C. Carr and D. T. Case, pp. 480–532. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  2. Thomas, Chad R., Christopher Carr, and Cynthia Keller 2005 Animal-Totemic Clans of Ohio Hopewellian Peoples. In Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction, edited by C. Carr and D. T. Case, pp. 339–385. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY.Google Scholar
  3. Carr, Christopher 2005b Salient Issues in the Social and Political Organizations of Northern Hopewellian Peoples: Contextualizing, Personalizing, and Generating Hopewell. In Gathering Hopewell: Society, Ritual, and Ritual Interaction, edited by C. Carr and D. T. Case, pp. 73–118. Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, New York, NY.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA

Personalised recommendations