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Contextualizing Preanalyses of the Ohio Hopewell Mortuary Data, I: Age, Sex, Burial-Deposit, and Intraburial Artifact Count Distributions

  • Christopher Carr
  • Beau J. Goldstein
  • D. Troy Case
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Reconstructing the social organization and broader culture and lifeways of a past people through the study of their mortuary remains is by nature an exercise in contextual analysis. The distributions of artifact classes, tomb forms, mortuary treatments, and skeletal traits of various kinds among different sets of individuals can give insight into socially defined categories of persons, their roles, modes of recruitment into social categories, divisions of labor, the degree of social hierarchy, and so on.

Keywords

Current Version Human Remains Deceased Person Grave Good Burial Mound 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  • Beau J. Goldstein
    • 2
  • D. Troy Case
    • 3
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Transcon EnvironmentalMesaUSA
  3. 3.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyNorth Carolina State University RaleighRaleighUSA

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