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The Functions and Meanings of Ohio Hopewell Ceremonial Artifacts in Ethnohistorical Perspective

  • Christopher Carr
  • Rex Weeks
  • Mark Bahti
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Clear projectile points knapped from quartz crystals. Five-tone, cane panpipes sheathed in silver and copper. Shiny hemispheres of copper, schist, or chlorite, sometimes hollow, sometimes solid. Alligator teeth, real and copper effigies. Plummets made of shell too light to have served as net sinkers. Barracuda jaws. These and other fantastic artifacts were socially and spiritually loud-spoken in the ceremonies and lives of Ohio Hopewell people. What are Western archaeologists to make of them, today, removed 2000 years and many cultural forms from Ohio Hopewell societies?

Keywords

Material Culture Word File Ethnographic Fieldwork Ancient Woodland Diacritical Mark 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  • Rex Weeks
    • 1
  • Mark Bahti
    • 1
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeArizona

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