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Documenting the Lives of Ohio Hopewell People: A Philosophical and Empirical Foundation

  • Christopher Carr
  • D. Troy Case
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

How does one come to know another? Ethnographers, social psychologists, historians, biographers, and economists and political scientists of micro decision-making each face this most fundamental issue in exploring and studying the social and individual lives of people. It is no less true of anthropological archaeologists who wish to come to know a past people. In actuality, all human beings share this concern, to the extent that they depend on others and must understand them and adapt to them at some level in the course of social relations.

Keywords

Archaeological Record Human Remains Grave Good Burial Mound Past People 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Carr
    • 1
  • D. Troy Case
    • 2
  1. 1.Anthropology Program, School of Human Evolution and Social ChangeArizona State UniversityTempeUSA
  2. 2.Department of Sociology and AnthropologyNorth Carolina State UniversityRaleighUSA

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