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Allelopathy from a Mathematical Modeling Perspective

  • Min An
  • De Li Liu
  • Hanwen Wu
  • Ying Hu Liu

Abstract

Of the disciplines involved in allelopathy research, mathematical modelling is making increasingly significant contributions. This chapter discusses, from a point of mathematical modelling view, some fundamental issues in allelopathy research, such as hormesis phenomenon and its interpretation, function of allelopathy and its relationship with competition, and periodic production of allelochemicals and stress.

Keywords

Chlorogenic Acid American Chemical Society Periodic Production Allelopathic Effect Allelopathic Potential 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Min An
    • 1
  • De Li Liu
    • 1
  • Hanwen Wu
    • 1
  • Ying Hu Liu
    • 2
  1. 1.E.H. Graham Center for Agricultural Innovation (a collaborative alliance between Charles Sturt University and NSW Department of Primary Industries)Wagga Wagga Agricultural InstituteWagga WaggaAustralia
  2. 2.South China Agricultural UniversityCollege of SciencesGuangzhouChina

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