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After the Case

  • Lisa Bergersen
  • Susan Foerster
  • Audrey C. Marshall
  • Jeffery Meadows

Abstract

At the end of the case, you will usually have to give up your hard-fought vascular access. The most common means of achieving hemostasis in pediatric patients is still manual compression. There is actually a technique to pulling catheters and holding the groin. Groin hematomas are usually the result of poor holding technique in establishing and maintaining hemostasis, and occur relatively commonly, especially during a fellow’s first month in the lab.

Keywords

Access Site Puncture Site Manual Compression Limb Length Discrepancy Significant Blood Loss 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lisa Bergersen
    • 1
  • Susan Foerster
    • 2
  • Audrey C. Marshall
    • 1
  • Jeffery Meadows
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of CardiologyChildren’s Hospital BostonBostonUSA
  2. 2.Washington University in St. LouisSt. LouisUSA
  3. 3.Division of Pediatric CardiologyUniversity of California at San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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