Surgery for Adrenocortical Carcinoma

  • James T. Broome
  • Barbra S. Miller
  • Paul G. Gauger
  • Gerard M. Doherty


Surgery is the mainstay of therapy for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). It is thought that the first technically successful resection of an ACC was performed in 1889 by Thornton [1] (see Thompson history). Although reported as a sarcoma, it is likely this was an ACC based on the description of size (>20 pounds), accompanying hirsutism, and recurrence of disease with death 2 years later.


Adrenal Gland Inferior Vena Cava Superior Mesenteric Artery Tumor Thrombus Laparoscopic Adrenalectomy 


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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • James T. Broome
    • 1
  • Barbra S. Miller
    • 2
  • Paul G. Gauger
    • 2
  • Gerard M. Doherty
    • 3
  1. 1.Vanderbilt Endocrine Surgery CenterVanderbilt UniversityNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Michigan Health System, University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA
  3. 3.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Michigan Health System, The University of MichiganAnn ArborUSA

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