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School-Related Violence and Prevention: Editorial Introduction

  • Thomas W. Miller

There are two major sections to the volume. Initially, we examine the theory, assessment, and an overview of the definition and boundary issues involved in the term “school violence” as used in research and applied prevention programs. The second section presents strategies and interventions for the prevention of school violence. As editor, the first chapter deals with the definition, scope of the problem, and the goals for prevention we have come to know. My esteemed colleague and friend Robert F. Kraus, M.D., joins me in addressing this chapter and the pathway to better understanding the definition, scope, and goals in the prevention of school violence. Robert F. Kraus is Professor of Psychiatry and Anthropology, Associate Residency Director of Training, and former Chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Kentucky. His career has involved clinical and academic administration, teaching, clinical practice, and research. Recently, he was the recipient of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Society for the Study of Psychiatry and Culture. He has served as a mentor and brings a rich understanding of the cultural issues to this definition and scope of the problem for violence in the schools.

Keywords

School Violence Forensic Psychiatry School Shooting Youth Violence Prevention Violence Prevention Program 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas W. Miller
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of KentuckyKentuckyUSA

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