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Understanding the Feeling Component of Human–Wildlife Interactions

  • Michael J Manfredo

Introduction

I was raised in Kane, Pennsylvania, a timber town surrounded by the Allegheny National Forest. Our house was located on the southern edge of town with forest bordering two sides. One lazy summer evening when I was 8 years old my best friend, his younger brother, and I decided to walk to the junior high school basketball courts. From our house, we walked up the hill and took a left-hand turn toward the school, which was just a block away. While walking toward the school, we had a unique vantage point. We could see the length of an open field that surrounded the back side of the school and opened from the patch of trees behind my home. As we wandered along the sidewalk, my friend’s younger brother opened his mouth and eyes wide, stammered, and pointed toward the field. I spun to see a large black bear ambling across the field! The bear was no more than 75 yards away but seemed oblivious to our presence.

As I know now, my amygdale, in the temporal lobe of my brain, received...

Keywords

Positive Affect Emotional Response Positive Emotion Emotional Intelligence Moral Decision 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Colorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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