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Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI): Overview

  • Cathy Catroppa
  • Vicki A. Anderson
Chapter

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to provide an overview of the: (1) prevalence of pediatric TBI; (2) the symptoms associated with pediatric TBI; (3) outcomes and predictors of pediatric TBI; and (4) rehabilitation in this area.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Glasgow Coma Scale Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Australian Centre for Child Neuropsychology StudiesMurdoch Children’s Research InstituteMelbourneAustralia
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyRoyal Children’s HospitalMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.University of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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