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Mild Traumatic Brain Injury

  • Grant L. Iverson
  • Rael T. Lange
Chapter

Abstract

Mild traumatic brain injuries (MTBI) are heterogeneous. This injury falls on a broad spectrum, from very mild neurometabolic changes in the brain with rapid recovery to permanent problems due to structural brain damage. It is incorrect to assume that MTBIs cannot cause permanent brain damage and it is incorrect to assume that MTBIs typically cause permanent brain damage. This is a highly individualized injury – most people recover relatively quickly and fully. However, some people have long-term problems. These long-term problems can be caused or maintained by multiple factors. Brain damage, although possible, is probably not the root cause of long-term problems in most patients. Instead, a diverse set of pre-existing and co-occurring conditions and factors likely cause and/or maintain symptoms and problems in most patients (e.g., personality characteristics; pre-existing health and mental health problems; co-morbid chronic pain, depression, anxiety disorders; social psychological factors; and litigation). It is important to carefully consider a multitude of factors that can cause or maintain symptom reporting long after an MTBI before concluding that a person is likely to have permanent damage to the function of his or her brain.

Keywords

Traumatic Brain Injury Military Personnel Mild Traumatic Brain Injury Intracranial Abnormality Permanent Brain Damage 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of British ColumbiaVancouverCanada
  2. 2.British Columbia Mental Health and Addiction ServicesVancouverCanada

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