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Somatoform Disorders, Factitious Disorder, and Malingering

  • Kyle Boone
Chapter

Abstract

Somatoform Disorders, Factitious Disorders and Malingering are among the most difficult issues for clinical neuropsychologists to differentiate. This chapter reviews diagnostic criteria for these disorders and emphasizes the differentiating characteristics among these disorders. The chapter reviews the current literature relating to applying Neuropsychological evaluation to assist in differential diagnosis of these disorders. The chapter also discuss the course, treatment and outcome of these disorders.

Keywords

Personality Disorder Borderline Personality Disorder Effort Indicator Somatization Disorder Dissociative Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kyle Boone
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Forensic StudiesAlliant International UniversityAlhambraUSA

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