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Primary Open Angle Glaucoma

  • Matthew G. McMenemy
Chapter

Abstract

Glaucoma is a significant global health problem. As of the year 2000, 67 million people worldwide were affected with “primary” glaucoma. Of these patients, 6.7 million were bilaterally blind. Glaucoma is second only to cataracts as a cause of blindness worldwide. In the United States, where glaucoma accounts for 11% of all cases of blindness, it is the number two cause of blindness behind macular degeneration. Among African-Americans, primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is the leading cause of blindness and POAG is also more prevalent in Hispanics relative to Caucasians. More than two million Americans are affected with one variety or another of glaucoma, with most patients in the USA having POAG.

Keywords

Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Optic Nerve Head Central Corneal Thickness Trabecular Meshwork Normal Tension Glaucoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matthew G. McMenemy
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyLone Star Eye Care, PASugar LandUSA

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