Treatment of Genital Warts



Genital warts caused by Human Papilloma Virus are the most common viral sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Over 24 million Americans are infected with Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), with the current prevalence among adolescents up to 15% and college-aged women up to 26.8% [1]. An increased prevalence has been correlated with earlier onset of sexual activity, multiple sex partners, and a higher frequency of casual relationships [2]. Approximately 500,000 to 1 million new cases of genital warts are believed to occur annually, which accounts for greater than 1,000,000 provider visits per year [2].


Human Papilloma Virus Genital Wart Petroleum Jelly Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine Human Papilloma Virus Type 
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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Family MedicineUniversity of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Robert Wood Johnson Medical SchoolNew BrunswickUSA

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