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Legal Aspects of Graded Exercise Testing

  • David L. Herbert
  • William G. Herbert
  • Russell D. White
  • Victor F. Froelicher

Graded exercise testing (ET) is performed by family physicians, internists and cardiologists. Currently, only about 13% of family physicians and 29% of internists perform this procedure in the cardiac evaluation of patients [1, 2]. A survey of the graduates of one family medicine residency program found a decrease in the percent of graduates performing exercise testing from 14.9% in the graduation years of 1975–1983 to 5.3% in the graduation years of 1994–2003 [3]. While the American Board of Internal Medicine requires its members to do this procedure, the number of internists performing exercise testing continues to decline.

Keywords

Stress Test Exercise Testing Cardiac Rehabilitation Exercise Stress Test Legal Aspect 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Herbert
    • 1
  • William G. Herbert
    • 2
  • Russell D. White
    • 3
  • Victor F. Froelicher
    • 4
  1. 1.Associates, LLC, 4580 Stephen Circle NWCantonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Human Nutrition, Foods, & Exercise, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia; The Exercise Standards and Malpractice ReporterLaboratory for Health & Exercise ScienceCantonUSA
  3. 3.Department of Community and Family MedicineUniversity of Missouri–Kansas City, Truman Medical Center LakewoodKansas CityUSA
  4. 4.Department of CardiologyStanford/Palo Alto Veterans Affairs Health Care CenterPalo AltoUSA

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