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Does the Primate Face Torque?

  • Callum F. Ross
Part of the Developments In Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Keywords

Zygomatic Arch Physical Anthropology Bite Force Power Stroke Strain Magnitude 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • Callum F. Ross
    • 1
  1. 1.Organismal Biology & AnatomyUniversity of ChicagoChicago

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