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Radical New Research

  • Vladimir Rubtsov
Chapter
Part of the Astronomers' Universe book series (ASTRONOM)

Zusammenfassung

Science is an amazing creation of the human mind, and the science community worldwide devotes its energies to its advancement. That sounds fine, but there are problems to consider. One of the most important is the demarcation between scientific and nonscientific forms of thinking in establishing knowledge of the world about us. Of course, the aim of science is to gain scientific truth, but scientists do not have any special claim to say what is true.

Keywords

Blast Wave Meteor Specialist Cosmic Dust Artificial Radionuclide Radioactive Fallout 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes and References

  1. 1.
    Derek de Solla Price, the founder of scientometrics, once added to a paper of his the following note: “This paper acknowledges no support whatsoever from any agency or foundation, but then, no time wasted, either, from preparing and submitting proposals.” Sounds fine, even if somewhat sad!Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Koginov, Y. The Mystery of the Tunguska miracle. – Sovetskaya Rossiya, 1959, August 28.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Plekhanov, G. F. The Tunguska Meteorite: Memoirs and Meditations. Tomsk: University Publishing House, 2000, p. 64 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ibid., p. 71.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    See Florensky, K. P. Preliminary Results of the 1961 Joint Tunguska Meteorite Expedition. – Meteoritika, Vol. 23, 1963 (in Russian). By the way, in this paper he also attempted to reanimate Yavnel’s findings – which had already been explained away by KMET itself as sample contaminations from the Sikhote-Alin iron meteorite.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Zhuravlev V. K., Zigel F. Y. The Tunguska Miracle: History of Investigations of the Tunguska Meteorite. Ekaterinburg: Basko, 1998, p. 44 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Plekhanov, G. F. The Tunguska Meteorite: Memoirs and Meditations. Tomsk: University Publishing House, 2000, p. 160 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Plekhanov, G. F. Some results of research work of the Independent Tunguska Exploration Group. – Meteoritika, Vol. 24, 1964 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Vasilyev, N. V. The Tunguska Meteorite: a Space Phenomenon of the Summer of 1908. Moscow: Russkaya Panorama, 2004, p. 25 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    The Problem of the Tunguska Meteorite. Tomsk: University Publishing House, 1963 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Plekhanov, G. F. Some results of research work of the Independent Tunguska Exploration Group. – Meteoritika, Vol. 24, 1964 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    See Kazantsev, A. A Guest from Space. – Tekhnika-Molodyozhi, 1951, No. 3, p. 34 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    By the way, nobody should accuse him, in this connection, of narrow-mindedness. Quite the contrary, Florensky understood the difficulties of the normal meteoritic explanation much better than other meteor specialists.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Zolotov, A. On the trail of a guest from space: Fragments from a diary. – Smena, 1962, Nos. 17–19 (in Russian).Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    See The Problem of the Tunguska Meteorite. Vol. 2. Tomsk: University Publishing House, 1967, pp. 151–153, 162–186 (in Russian). Incidentally, in one of these papers Zolotov convincingly rebutted the “dusty model” of the TSB that was still cherished by Gennady Plekhanov.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Florensky, K. P. Preliminary Results of the 1961 Joint Tunguska Meteorite Expedition. – Meteoritika, Vol. 23, 1963, p. 28 (in Russian).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimir Rubtsov
    • 1
  1. 1.KharkovUkraine

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