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Ideas Become Bizarre

  • Vladimir Rubtsov
Chapter
Part of the Astronomers' Universe book series (ASTRONOM)

Zusammenfassung

After World War II, the Soviet Union found itself with many problems. Most pressing was the need to rebuild the economy and to develop new weapons. The United States ended the war as the world economic leader, whereas the USSR, which hardly had been an economic giant before the war, had about a third of its national wealth destroyed. Its war casualties reached 27 million.

Keywords

Blast Wave Atomic Bomb Science Fiction Meteoritic Iron Space Body 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Notes and References

  1. 1.
    For details see Kazantsev, A. P. Dotted Recollections. In: Kazantsev, A. P. The Ice is Returning. Moscow: Molodaya Gvardiya, 1981 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    See Zhuravlev, V. K., Zigel, F. Y. The Tunguska Miracle: History of Investigations of the Tunguska Meteorite. Ekaterinburg: Basko, 1998, p. 23 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    The AAGS was an academic organization of the USSR, carrying out research in the fields of astronomy, geodesy, and cartography, and its members were both professional astronomers and amateurs.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Zhuravlev, V. K., Zigel, F. Y. op cit., p. 24.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
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    See Staniukovich, K. P., Fedynsky, V. V. On the devastation effect of meteoritic impacts. – Reports of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, New Series, 1947, Vol. 57, No. 2 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    Kazantsev, A. P. The Explosion. – Vokrug Sveta, 1946, No. 1, p. 41 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    Krinov, E. L., Yavnel, A. A. The Tunguska meteorite is no longer an enigma. – Komsomolskaya Pravda, 1957, September 8 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    See Vronsky, B. By the Path of Kulik’s: A Tale About the Tunguska Meteorite. Moscow: Mysl, 1984, p. 34 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    Florensky, K. P., Vronsky, B. I., Emelyanov, Y. M., Zotkin, I. T., Kirova, O. A. Preliminary results of the work of the Tunguska meteoritic expedition of 1958. – Meteoritika, Vol. 19, 1960 (in Russian), pp. 122, 126.Google Scholar
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    Ibid., p. 131.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Credit for this discovery must be given to Dr. Yury Emelyanov.Google Scholar
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    Florensky, K. P., Vronsky, B. I., Emelyanov, Y. M., Zotkin, I. T., Kirova, O. A. Preliminary results of the work of the Tunguska meteoritic expedition of 1958. – Meteoritika, Vol. 19, 1960 (in Russian), p. 120. Later, there were found at Tunguska yet more pronounced manifestations of this effect – where the width of tree rings reached almost two centimeters. Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    Ibid., p. 131.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
  26. 26.
    The leading Soviet academic organization involved in investigation of explosions, especially nuclear explosions.Google Scholar
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    See On the Tunguska Meteorite. – Priroda, 1959, No. 11 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    See Staniukovich, K. P., Shalimov, V. P. On the motion of meteor bodies in the atmosphere of the Earth. – Meteoritika, Vol. 20, 1961 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    See Fesenkov, V. G., Krinov, E. L. News about the Tunguska meteorite. – Herald of the Academy of Sciences of the USSR, 1960, Vol. 30, No. 12 (in Russian).Google Scholar
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    Fesenkov, V. G. On the nature of the Tunguska Meteorite. – Meteoritika, Vol. 20, 1961, p. 30 (in Russian).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Vladimir Rubtsov
    • 1
  1. 1.KharkovUkraine

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