Gatway to the stars

  • Giulio Magli

Egyptologists usually maintain that they have come to understand almost everything about the project of the great geometrical pyramids and about their structural elements. Some minor details need to be studied further, but otherwise they feel that it is clear that the Great Pyramid was nothing but a messy makeshift building site, where architects decided to change their minds from time to time. Further, one day Khufu came along and decided he wanted to be buried in another chamber while, amid all the confusion, his men were building shafts as wide as handkerchiefs and scores of meters long, set diagonally in relation to the building's plane, just to let in air for the laborers.

So the book ends here. The sacred landscape and all the other things I've tortured you with for 15 chapters have nothing to do with the Old Kingdom. As for astronomy, forget it. And if in the Pyramid Age there were no howling barbarians, well, we weren't far off it.

I'm exhausted, as the main character in Umberto Eco's Name of the Rose would say, my thumb aches (even though I'm writing with a computer): dreaming up nonsense is exhausting. “Nonsense” is in fact the only word to define the way most Egyptologists have interpreted the Great Pyramid in the last 100 years – as I took pains to show you in the last chapter. Why?

It is generally taken for granted that the subterranean chamber is unfinished. Yet if you abandon an underground room at an incomplete stage, logically you would simply stop excavating down any further, not meticulously carve out the whole room at half-height, creating a sort of womb-like space.


Ventilation Shaft Climbing Robot German Engineer Incomplete Stage Sacred Landscape 


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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Giulio Magli

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